Sunday, February 2, 2014

On Sirens: Excerpts from the Sex Lives of Sorcerers






This is a mashup of a passage about the origins of sirens from the novel The Sex Lives of Sorcerers, which tells the story of a woman who, being identified as the reincarnation of a mythical creature, becomes the object of interest among sorcerers from another dimension. References to alchemy, medieval occultism, steganography, and sex magic permeate the novel, which is the second in the Sorcerers and Magi series. Within the video above,  Illustrations of Odysseus and the sirens by Waterhouse, Otto Greiner, and Herbert James Draper are paired with studies of sirens by Soror ZSD23. The background score is gong music using a 24-inch Paiste symphonic gong, rattles, and voice.

Sirens were creatures that were half-bird, half-woman. . . . . According to classical myth, they lived on treacherously rocky isles off the coast of Sicily. They wanted nothing more than to entice passing sailors.  . . . these sailors. . . found themselves in listless, dumbfounded stupors from which they languished and died.
It was portended that if a ship passed in which the occupants were resistant to the sirens’ song, the sirens . . . would kill themselves. Thus, it is told in the Odyssey that these creatures leaped off cliffs when the epic’s hero, Odysseus, and his crew sailed by.
The sirens descended to the Underworld where they continued to sing, this time in mourning for the dead. Their imagery became mixed  with that of mermaids who themselves, were the mystical remnants of disposed-of women, who taking vengeance on the violence done to them, lured men to their deaths with . . . the sweetness of their song.
It all meant something metaphorical about men, women, ecstasy, sense control, and, of course, sex and death . . . . 

And another excerpt:

In the years that had gone by, Lundragon had made a name for himself as an all-seeing eye and a highly skilled practitioner of coercive magic. He had earned a reputation for being a rather merciless controller, an insidious puppeteer—he and his friend, Paleologos, both.
The two were known to be quite bacchanalian as well: wine, women, and song in excess. All that on top of being provocative academicians and scientists of distinction.
Lundragon materialized—out of the ether—a crisp parchment scroll and held it out toward Anderson.
“This is a facsimile of the document,” he told the mage. “It’s in code and quite undecipherable.”
“How does the document put any claim on Bellaluna Drago, then?” Michael protested.
Lundragon shot a hateful glance at Michael for interrupting his rapport with Anderson Albright Magus.
“It’s not meant for us to decipher. It was written for the fairy,” Paleologos interjected.
“If she can decipher this, we can verify her speciation and everyone will know that she is my own and that what I am saying—and have been saying all along—is true,” Lundragon exclaimed.
“I think you and the ‘Moray’ Eel-Lady have been drinking from the same bottle,” Michael quipped.
“And I think that it was remarkably adventurous of you, being a ‘closet-magus’ and all, to stick it into an entity who happened to name herself after the death-dealing Fate—or Moerae—of classical Greek myth, ‘Aisa,’” Lundragon mused. “The role of this Fate, who with her two sisters sang with sirens, was to cut the thread that her sisters, Clotho and Lachesis, spun and wove: the thread of life. Isn’t that how the story goes, Albright Magus? Tell me, did you consider that when you yourself engaged in your tender dalliance with the entity?”
Anderson did not react although Michael called Lundragon a despicable fiend. With that, Lundragon, in rage, materialized a copper- and bronze-encrusted oak staff. He aimed its olivine finial, which was a figurine of a winged creature with the head of a hawk and the body of a lizard (a moon dragon, that is), at Michael.
“Lundragon Sortiar,” Anderson exclaimed in an urgent tone. “We’ll speak alone you and me. We’ll sort it out. Scuffling out here in the open in view of Commons would be . . .” His voice trailed off because the statement needn’t have been elaborated on.
Upon composing himself, Lundragon uttered that he always had held Anderson in high regard even if the sentiment wasn’t wholly reciprocated. He said that he indeed would very much like to speak with Anderson alone in a civil manner at a site more conducive to professional conversation.
“I will prove myself to you, Sir,” Lundragon insisted in a tone trimmed with vehemence. “And in so doing, liberate you from the residual effects of the malaise that has crippled you for too long.” He glared accusingly at Michael to let it be known in a glance that his contempt for him, considering Michael’s  role in Anderson’s melodrama with Aisa Morae, knew no limit.

It was decided that Lundragon and Albright would meet again in two days’ time at Lundragon’s studio at the Royal Dominion of Principalis Academy of Magical Arts and Sciences back home in the Inner Plane. Then, despite that they were standing in the open in a populated woodland park in the Outer Plane, Lundragon and Paleologos abruptly translocated out of sight.


Friday, January 3, 2014

Magic is potentiated when the self is effaced by pleasure and pain.

Austin Osman Spare

“Magic is potentiated when the self is effaced by pleasure and pain.” This statement is said by Leo de Lux to Mirelle Soleil in the fantasy fiction novel La Maga A Story about Sorcerers and Magi by Soror ZSD23.  But what does this mean?  It means that paradigmatic shifts occur at the extremes of consciousness.  You have heard the adage “it is always darkest before dawn” or “I saw the light” or you have heard stories about people who claimed to have been “reborn” or who have claimed to become “enlightened” at a direly critical point during an emotional crisis.  This is the basic idea.

This idea that paradigmatic shifts occur at the extremes of consciousness is utilized in postmodern magic and was advanced by the  early 20th century sorcerer Austin Osman Spare (1886-1956) who potentiated his magic through inducing liminal states of consciousness usually either through orgasm or a condition he called the “death posture,” which was a (very not recommended) practice involving pseudo-catalepsy and auto asphyxiation.  Later, magical practitioners spoke of the potentiation of magical intention through excitatory or inhibitory techniques, recognized as key in shamanic and mystical initiatory experiences.  An example of an excitatory technique might be dancing to exhaustion or else engaging in some other activity past the point of tolerance (eg, “erotocomatose lucidity,” a practice brainstormed by one of Aleister Crowley’s lovers and possibly inspired by legendary Tantric sex practices, theoretically involving keeping a person in a state of sexual stimulation through “any means possible” until that person had an “enlightenment”-type experience or died). 

A resourceful and healthful rather than extreme or  self-harming example of an excitatory technique is found in Kundalini and other types of yoga in which a simple motion or posture is held or continued through and past the point of emotional and physical resistance.  The experience of breaking through physical resistance becomes a metaphor and method for breaking through psychological blocks.  When a psychological block is neutralized, thoughts and behaviors are reframed and neural pathways in the brain are rerouted.
An alternate example of how an excitatory technique might work and how an inhibitory technique might work is related to hypnotic technique.  Hypnotic-type suggestion best occurs in states of liminal consciousness.  These might be states between waking and sleep, during orgasm, states of shock or surprise, or deep self-absorbed focus or fixation.  In these states, there is a window of opportunity to bypass the mind’s critical factor, or what is known in magic as the psychic censor.  When the critical factor is bypassed, which is what occurs in hypnotic suggestion, new ways of thinking and behaving can be programmed into the subconscious mind.  A person who understands how to skillfully induce and embed hypnotic suggestion into her own mind or the minds of others could establish paradigmatic change with efficiency, grace, and ease and minimal drama, couldn’t she?


For long, people have thought of magic as something supernatural and spooky.  Even in manifestation spirituality, which is certainly a form of magic although some practitioners wish to think otherwise, people hold the idea that some divine spiritual force in the universe is magically making things happen for them or else they may be of the opinion that their personal-ego desires and quantum physics  are somehow related.  But what if magic was really a psychodynamic process?  What if magic and the ability to manifest one’s desires had nothing to do with spooky supernaturalism or belief in miracles but with the quality of belie f, perception, attitude, and behavior  and the effects these expressions have on interpersonal and intrapersonal interactions?  What if it was all about where one’s attention was placed and where, through skill, one could place someone else’s attention and perception and manipulate one’s own and others’ reactions and motives?


Excerpt from  Chapter 13 The Daughter from La Maga A Story about Sorcerers and Magi

Leo de Lux Sortiar
“If anyone asks, you’re a member of this house,” he said quietly and glared at her. “Understand what this means,” he snapped. “Do not cross me. Do not interfere with my designs or my momentum. Can you manage that, Mirelle?”
She nodded. The Consul huffed and grimaced. He stood up and approached his altar. “Alright, then. Stand here,” he commanded. Mirelle complied. The Consul grasped a highly polished diamond-shaped dagger from the altar and lightly pressed it against Mirelle’s breast bone. With his free hand, he gripped the back of the girl’s head and arched her neck into a taut and choking posture. He glared into her eyes, white to white. Mirelle felt her blood drain from fear of what he had in mind only to feel the rush of the hallmark of empowerment initiations—a hot, scintillating, and heady pulsation.
“‘Magic is potentiated when the self is effaced by pleasure or pain,’” the Consul lulled.
An electrically erotic sensation flooded through the dagger into Mirelle’s chest and through the man’s eyes into her brain. She relaxed into it. The searing stare and torturous grip became softer, until they seemed like a caress.
The Consul gently released his hold. He placed the dagger within inches of Mirelle’s brow. She focused on it past the light that was flooding her mind. The platinum grip had a ruby and citrine inlay of gems that spelled “de Lux.”
The man grinned as if he didn’t think Mirelle would believe what she would next see. A miniature angel with a lion on its breastplate and a flaming sword in hand emerged from the dagger and flew into her head. It generated a peculiar tickle as it snaked its way to her chest where it settled like a glowing ember.
He placed the dagger back on the altar and announced as if commanding the spirits there, “No one dare touch this child with malice! She belongs to me.” 

Wednesday, January 1, 2014

Sofia La Maga An Excerpt from La Maga A Story about Sorcerers and Magi

 Leonard (Junior) and his buddies, Anil, Cary, and Bertrand, had gotten a glimpse of Sofia La Maga the day before. They gloated like the spoiled-brat junior elitist patricians they were that the hype about the professor was nonsense. It was just as Leonard’s father had insisted. Professor La Maga was nothing but a bedraggled kitchen witch.
She didn’t seem at all like the stories told about her. In fact, she roamed through the secondary school’s second-floor corridor as if she were roller-skating with three left feet and had the mental disposition of a hedgehog. 
She was a tall, slender but robust woman with the rough-and-tumble appearance of someone who had weathered hard climbs in exotic lands. Her clothes were rustic, quaintly worn, and embellished with savage jewelry: jangling bells and sashes of bone and fur, claws, shells, and spike-studded pods. Her Medusa-like mane was haphazardly plaited here and there and cluttered her face, blinding her as she toddled along.  She was gripping a mass of overstuffed folders, and from her arms dangled plastic bags filled with items that were heavy such that they swung like pendulums in the wake of her clumsy pace. The heels of her worn leather lace-up boots alternately caught on the frayed hem of an ankle-length skirt. It caused her to wobble pathetically as the heavy bags alternately beat against her ribs. 

No one offered assistance. They were busy gawking at her and probably thinking the same as Leonard and his pals were. This was the prodigy who had been gallivanting across exotic lands and speed-reading through mentorships with wild wizards, shamans, and anchorites? 

Excerpt from Chapter 1. The Conus Magus Maneuver from the novel La Maga A Story about Sorcerers and Magi by Soror ZSD23.  Available from amazon.com and smashwords.com


Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Excerpt from La Maga A Story About Sorcerers and Magi Ignus natura renovatur integra

“Who are you, Zosimo Sortiar,” Leo asked, even though the answer was now obvious, just as Mirelle had said it would be.
Zosimo flashed another wide smile. “I’m the brother,” he gloated. “They took the boy, not the girl.” He winked and smirked as if the joke were on “them” for doing so. “I want to be a Lion of Light,” he added. “Are you one of those?”
“I’ve assumed my namesake,” Leo replied. “I don’t know what I’ll become for it, living in exile as it were,” he muttered, adding, “Sofia’s brother?”
“You’re going to be a cult hero, like Jesus—or maybe Lucifer. Something like that,” Zosimo said in childlike verbal gambol.
“A fallen star. Fallen from grace in humiliation,” Leo lilted.
“The same as the rest of us,” Zosimo consoled. “The dust of a falling star fallen. Matter, a cinder, volatile ash poised to be ignited and transformed into its latent potential in pure, fiery light. Ignus natura renovatur integra.You wanted Deep Inner Planes. But they don’t come out of a gum ball machine.”
“I’m not complaining. I’m prepared,” Leo stuttered.

Zosimo grinned thoughtfully.  “’Nature in its entirety is regenerated in fire,’” he softly lilted.  It was an alchemical adage about the nature of transformation. After going awkwardly mute for a while, Zosimo said, “I’m the brother” again.

Except from Chapter 15 Nature in Its Entirety Is Regenerated in Fire in La Maga A Story about Sorcerers and Magi by Soror ZSD23 available through amazon.com and smashwords.com



Friday, November 22, 2013

On Sirens: An Excerpt from The Sex Lives of Sorcerers



Sirens were creatures that were half-bird, half-woman, in origin, perhaps like the Egyptian ba. To the ancient Egyptians, the ba was the surviving part of a person that flew to the Underworld when a person died, but sirens were renegade creatures. According to classical myth, they lived on treacherously rocky isles off the coast of Sicily. They wanted nothing more than to entice passing sailors. Being lured, these sailors, thinking they’d get good head, instead found themselves in listless, dumbfounded stupors from which they languished and died.

It was portended that if a ship passed in which the occupants were resistant to the sirens’ song, the sirens, in frenzied dismay, would kill themselves. Thus, it is told in the Odyssey that these creatures leaped off cliffs when the epic’s hero, Odysseus, and his crew sailed by.

The sirens descended to the Underworld where they continued to sing, this time in mourning for the dead. Their imagery became mixed up with that of mermaids who themselves, in lore, were the mystical remnants of disposed-of women, who taking vengeance on the violence done to them, lured men to their deaths with the promise of sex through the sweetness of their song.

It all meant something metaphorical about men, women, ecstasy, sense control, and, of course, sex and death. One had to ponder it and trace the theme and imagery across cultures and time. 

--Excerpt from Chapter 2 .[The High Priestess] The Legacy of Lunaris Dracon from The Sex Lives of Sorcerers by Soror ZSD23 available on amazon.com and smashwords.com

Sunday, September 1, 2013

Scyring the Olympic Spirits: A Pictorial Guide

Monday
.Phul/Luna/Diana: There is no contrivance in joy. Joy is a pervading, core principle. A living thing is the ephemeral measurement and relationship through which joy can be experienced. Experience the bliss and potency of the moment.

Tuesday
Phaleg/Mars/Athena: Have a single focus and drive it through. An intention must be decisive and unmixed and then directed like a fiery spear or arrow into the heart of its target. 

Wednesday
Ophiel/Mercury: What do you want to know? Observation and careful listening are keys to persuade and confound to accomplish an intention. Single-minded focus, poise, and integration need to be cultivated. 

Thursday
Bethor/Jupiter What do you want to happen? For manifestation to occur, the infinite potential must be funneled into a point of definition and function. 
Friday
Hagith/Venus: I am the Cosmos and Beauty of Being. There is a tender, loving, giving, refreshing, purifying, and enveloping Principle. Meditate on and invoke that Principle for encouragement and solace and to become a source of encouragement and solace for others.
Saturday
Aratron/Saturn “He who is the Intelligible Principle in Whom All Things Rest.”
There is a large, mighty, thoughtful, loving, protective, possessive, and righteous Principle. Manifestation, personhood, and personal power are predicated on concentrating time and space into boundaries and form. 

Sunday
Och/Sol: There is no entity; there is only Self. I am complete openness.


Secrets-World-Adventures-Astral-ebook. Print edition upcoming.